Tag Archives: Google

Top 10 multimedia skills new journalists should have

Photo by Flickr user EIU
Photo by Flickr user EIU

Now that I’m in a university environment, I’ve been thinking about the skills I learned as a journalism student, and what schools are teaching students today.

Ideally, a student should graduate from journalism school with skills that prepare them to walk into a newsroom – any newsroom – and thrive. (These skills should of course be in addition to sound news judgement and an understanding of journalism ethics and the importance of responsible reporting.)

So here’s my grocery list of ideal skills for the newsroom newbie:

Continue reading Top 10 multimedia skills new journalists should have

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ONA’s Social media debate: Best practices vs. bad habits

This was a great debate at the Online News Association conference. Rather than try to sum it up, I decided to post as a Q&A.

Panel members included:

Eric Carvin, Social Media Editor, Associated Press
Liz Heron, Director of Social Media, Wall Street Journal
Niketa Patel, Social Media PM, CNN
Anthony De Rosa, Social Media Editor and columnist, Reuters

Q: Liking people and organizations on Facebook – does the terminology need to be changed?

Heron: I don’t get too hung up on it. I don’t see liking as a personal endorsement, people aren’t going to think you’re endorsing that person

Patel:– Should be following people who have the same beat, and follow as many people as you can

Carvin: :At AP, we recommend that journalists follow opponents of a candidate as well as original candidate

De Rosa: I think you have to have common sense, don’t go out of your way to stray from perception

Heron: It allows for more transparency, allows for more scrutinty and bias, but it’s worth it to be out there and more available to people

Q: When is it appropriate to be tweeting/sharing unconfirmed reports?

Continue reading ONA’s Social media debate: Best practices vs. bad habits

Using Facebook and Google to run a student newsroom

I teach a second-year ‘Fundamentals of Reporting’ class at Carleton University’s j-school –  but often I’m learning just as much from the students.

These past three weeks, we’ve been running ‘newsroom days’ – students come in with a story, and then head out for the day to chase another, putting out a publication at 5 p.m. The class is large enough that we actually put out two publications at the end of the day, with students alternating roles between Managing Editor or desker and reporter.

This year, Facebook and Google played key roles in putting out our student publications at the end of the day.

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Pinterest, Google+ and the gender divide in social media

As we set up our Pinterest page, a colleague said to me, “You know that it’s mostly women on Pinterest.”

I paused. “And?…..”

“Well, that’s a good thing, because our Google+ page is seen by mostly men.”

Uh huh…

“And it’s mostly crafty lifestyle stuff on Pinterest, so we should put that kind of thing on there.”

I’m not even going to comment on the sexist comment that women are only interested in “crafty lifestyle stuff” (feel free to do so in the comments area below), as such is life in a male-dominated newsroom.

And he’s not off. We set up an Ottawa Citizen Homes page on Facebook last fall, and it has 16 fans. In the first 8 minutes of its existence, our Homes pinboard on Pinterest had 39 followers.

Continue reading Pinterest, Google+ and the gender divide in social media

Politicians, social media, and why journalists should pay attention

If you were living under a rock and missed it, U.S. President Barack Obama held a town hall ‘with the people’ via a Google+ hangout this week.

“Hunh,” said a colleague in the newsroom, “That’s neat.”

It’s more than neat – it’s a big shift we need to pay attention to.

As journalists, we have often functioned as ‘middle men’, the only way the public can access politicians.

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We tried a Google+ hangout and it didn’t suck (in fact, it was awesome)

Today, we went way out of our comfort zone, and tried something (quite publicly) with no idea of its success.

We hung out on Google+, and talked about the platform and how news agencies should use it.

I was a little nervous, I’ll admit. I had no idea how it was going to go.

Within minutes, we (Online editor Roberta Pennington and I) got into a groove – it was an honest discussion about Google+ and how hangouts can be used.

Continue reading We tried a Google+ hangout and it didn’t suck (in fact, it was awesome)

Our Google+ adventure, and an uncomfortable readiness to fail

Enough is enough. At some point, you just have to just jump into the pool.

Or, in this case, invite everyone to come swimming.

A few of us have been messing around in google+ for a while, and we like the idea of its hangouts.

We’re not completely sure how people are using g+ (is it replacing Facebook for some??), and I was inspired by the New York Times, and how its tech team hosted a google+ hangout, talking about social media and asking readers how the NYT should use this platform.

Eighty people took part in that hangout. Wow, I thought, what an awesome way to get reader feedback.

Continue reading Our Google+ adventure, and an uncomfortable readiness to fail

As newsrooms forge ahead, training can’t be left behind

Twitter announced a pretty big overhaul yesterday, with two big changes for our business: brand pages can now be built in Twitter, and Tweets will be more easily embeddedable.

Fantastic news, I thought, and Tweeted this:

Soon after, however,  @ByDanielVictor provided a reality check, reminding followers that Tweets are not written in stone.

The Twitter updates are great news for journalists (blog post coming soon!), and those in the social media sphere are no doubt excited. I know I am.

However, I was reminded this week the importance making sure everyone  understands new technologies, and how we use them.

Continue reading As newsrooms forge ahead, training can’t be left behind

Jeff Jarvis reveals his Public Parts

Jeff Jarvis is an unabashed optimist.

He acknowledged massive changes brought on by the Internet – likening this era to the early days of the Gutenberg Press – and said we need to embrace publicness.

Publicness, he explained is putting it out there, letting it all hang out.

Right now you’re probably cringing, thinking about how to reset your Facebook and Google+ privacy settings so that the unknown student in India doesn’t see those pics of your son in little league.

And that’s a natural reaction to change, Jarvis pointed out during the launch of his book Public Parts Friday night at a Third Tuesday meetup.

He talked about the introduction of the Gutenberg press, and the use of the Kodak camera, and people were first most concerned about their privacy.

“It’s important when we have change we worry about the bad things that can happen, but it’s also important to realize what good can happen,” Jarvis said.

“Privacy matters. It’s important, it needs protection. But we are talking so much about privacy that I have a fear about publicness. That’s why I wrote this book.

Continue reading Jeff Jarvis reveals his Public Parts

Journalism and the ubiquity of mobile

When I sent my reporting class out to do an observational reporting exercise (basically ‘go be a fly on the wall’) this week, only about 20 per cent of them left with their note books.

Interesting, I thought. I wondered how they would do with this assignment.

They were told to go out and watch a scene, and come back with 10 details to share with the group.

How to remember intricate details of a scene without a notebook? I didn’t know how they would do it.

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