Tag Archives: iPhone

Audio reporting tools of the trade: then and now

Note the 3-metre cord on the microphone, which was designed for karaoke.
Note the 3-metre cord on the microphone, which was designed for karaoke. I wound it up and held extra cord together with a hair elastic. Very technical.

This is an I-love-technology piece, gird yourselves accordingly.

Fourteen years ago, as a journalism student, I recorded a lot of audio.

This set up (pictured left),  included the latest technology: a smallish cassette recorder, and a giant ice-cream-cone-shaped microphone.

I was set. I recorded ‘tape’ of interviews for assignments, and eventually did a 30-minute radio documentary about women journalists working on Parliament Hill from 1966 – 1996. (Note to self: Find and digitize, some big names on there).

In my first year of  journalism school, we were taught to edit tape using an Ampex, razors and tape.  I’m not making this up.

Mary McGuire, my radio professor back then,  tweeted  a pic of the actual Ampex I worked on:

ampex

Later, ‘new technology’ was brought in, and we were taught digital editing.  (Cue angels singing, as I was never very handy with razors and tape.)

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Cocktails and community in news

There’s a quasi-time-honoured tradition of cocktails and banter that have led to news leads.

But a party I recently attended reminded me of the importance of involving the community in news. (By this I mean more than the lot of us getting hammered.)

Typically, party music is the job of the host. Indeed, for this party, the host spent the day on iTunes, downloading and cultivating the perfect playlist that would create the absolute ideal atmosphere for merriment.

She needn’t have bothered.

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Journalism and the ubiquity of mobile

When I sent my reporting class out to do an observational reporting exercise (basically ‘go be a fly on the wall’) this week, only about 20 per cent of them left with their note books.

Interesting, I thought. I wondered how they would do with this assignment.

They were told to go out and watch a scene, and come back with 10 details to share with the group.

How to remember intricate details of a scene without a notebook? I didn’t know how they would do it.

Continue reading Journalism and the ubiquity of mobile