Tag Archives: Ottawa

Booze, Twitter and what people really want out of a tweet

A friend of mine, recently promoted to an executive-level position, asked if I could help her with Twitter.

“I’ve been told I need to twit,” she said.

It’s extremely (if dangerously so) easy, I told her, and I offered up this gem: don’t drink and tweet.

Indeed, when Jeff Jarvis was in Ottawa last fall promoting his book Public Parts and advocating for publicness, he spoke of an incident where he did just that.

After a few glasses of wine, he was watching a TV report on the debt ceiling, and he tweeted this:

One of Jarvis’ followers suggest he use the hashtag ‘#fuckyouwashington’ and things took off – a week later more than 100,000 people were using the hash tag. (Jarvis has a hilarious account of the incident, and a data visualization of the flurry of #fuckyouwashington tweets)

But at his Ottawa talk, Jarvis said that while the flurry of the hash tag was interesting and exciting, he wasn’t sure twitter was the right place to go after a drink or two.

Continue reading Booze, Twitter and what people really want out of a tweet

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Lurking on social media isn’t enough

Thank you to Steve Buttry for putting it plainly today: Lurking on Twitter isn’t enough.

I’ve heard from far too many journalists who sign up for Twitter, then don’t Tweet. Worse, they don’t follow anyone. So now they have an account that’s dormant. These same folks have probably set up a Facebook account, but they’ve added a few friends and don’t post.

In a webinar hosted Tuesday by Newspapers Canada, Buttry pointed out that by building followers and being conversational, you’re going to have stronger engagement.

And when it comes to crowd sourcing or looking for information in the public domain, you’re going to be more effective if you’ve built up a good social media presence.

Continue reading Lurking on social media isn’t enough

Live chats: playing host to a mass interview

There are close to 1 million people in our city. I’m willing to bet they can come up with more questions than the 100 folks in our newsroom can.

For that reason, I love that newsrooms like ours are starting to change the way they are exchanging information. We’re no longer broadcasting news, we’re hosting the conversation.

Live chats are a great way to connect our readers directly with the source. I think of it as throwing a fantastic cocktail party with all the mover and shakers… and our readers. All we do is make the connection, supply the venue, and watch the conversation unfold.

Continue reading Live chats: playing host to a mass interview